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Braid Stories

Each braid creates it’s own story, which it tells through color and pattern. Connect with a braid and the story begins anew. These are the original narratives.

70’s Vinyl – My close friend has a record collection that fills one wall. We listen to whatever we want and the vinyl casts it’s spell.

Minnowflex – From above the minnow is dark, almost unseen, but from below the bright light of the sky dances across the minnow’s scales.

 

Whotree – Fans of Dr. Seuss will appreciate that this fanciful fern could easily have been his perfect tree. This braid reconnects me with Cindy Lou Who and the Grinch’s heart felt change.

 

Heart Beat – I wonder if my beating heart sooths my dog as he lies seemingly asleep on my chest, ready to spring up if his world suddenly shifts, breaking our primal connection.

Bear Claw

Bear Claw – Northwest indigenous peoples have a have a spiritual, physical, social and cultural connection to nature and the land. The bear has great self awareness and symbolizes family and strength. A bear paw print, chanced upon in fresh mud, is an exhilarating find.

Turbine

Turbine – I stop to think about what spins my turbine. Recently it was a stream of love and caring that blew right through me. Normally it is a regular old blast of hot air that keeps it spinning.

Wave

 Wave – Silverfoot folk are water folk. From windsurfing through surfing and now kite boarding, a water life, for us, is part of a life well lived.

 

Fire Flower – Reminds me of a sweet encounter that leaves me breathless and awed. The flower itself foretells of the end of summer and the melancholy that brings.

Side Eyes

Side Eyes - I take the time to see what I normally miss by purposefully not looking directly at what interests me. I try to see what others miss, allowing myself to see without seeming to be interested.

Bird Biscuit – In Native American lore the Thunderbird represents the forces of thunder, lightning and storms but it also believed to protect humans by fighting evil spirits.

  

Wind Flower – No flower expresses the shape and intent of the wind like the falling cherry blossom. Who among us cannot instantly conjure the image of the wind and the blossom’s annual dance?

Maui Waui

 Maui Waui – Each visit the hibiscus welcomes us to a more vibrant life.

Disco

 Disco – Flashing strobe lights, swirling sweating bodies, and a pulsating, four-tothe-floor (boom-boom-boom-boom) high-energy rhythm—all energized by the music that became known as disco. Too bad if you missed it!

Elusive Elk

 Elusive Elk – Elk are associated with love in many tribes, and Native American legends often credit elk with the creation of the first flute, an instrument used by men to woo women. In some Pacific Northwest tribes, elk are also considered to be particular protectors of women.

Pebbles

 Pebbles – What if planets turn out to be galactic pebbles shaped, then reshaped, by the erosive forces of endless time? I’m plagued by these questions.

16 Bits

 16 Bits – Just what would the bar code for a person’s life look like? If we had to be scanned to be initially understood which colors would you choose? This about sums it up for me.

Fiesta

 Fiesta – Celebrating is something I would love to do more often than I do. This braid is a reminder to me to do just that. Lighten up and smile it tells me. Enjoy life!

Monet

 Monet – Get close enough to an image so you can only see the dots of color. Notice the interplay between light and color, and between the different colors assembled together.

Wild Willow

 Wild Willow – Seen and then not seen The wind ripples a willow And nothing has changed

Baleen

 Baleen – Whales are believed to offer themselves up as food to help indigenous people survive, thereby holding a special position of honor and respect. Whales are also associated with wisdom and spiritual awareness in some Salishan tribes.

Pacific Otter

 Pacific Otter – Otters are considered lucky animals in many Native American cultures and the otter is a symbol of loyalty and honesty.

Woodgrain

 Woodgrain – The grain is different for every piece of wood. Look closely at a moment in time, perhaps from before your time, and a glimpse of a tree of great size might be revealed.

Maple Leaf

 Maple Leaf – – As early as the 1700’s early settlers have used the Maple Leaf as a symbol for what was to become Canada. In 1965 the red maple leaf became the symbol for our flag.

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